E-MailSucheenglishdeutschTwitterYouTubeFacebook

Logo

 

24th Berlin Colloquium
"Living safely in the city of the future"

 
 

Participation fee: €50.-
Reduced rate: €25.-

Moved to 2022 due to the pandemic – more information will follow

Scientific director:Prof. Dr. Ralf Poscher
Max Planck Institute for the Study of Crime, Security and Law, Freiburg, Germany
Moderation: Angela Elis

Urbanization is a key trend of our century. This is evidenced not only by the rapid growth of megacities in many regions of the world, but also by the development of conurbations and entire metropolitan regions in Germany and Europe. According to estimates, around two-thirds of all people will be living in cities by 2050. However, this development is closely linked to matters of urban security.

What will the security of the inhabitants of cities be like in the future? Crime is a significant fear factor in the public perception, and scenarios of threat are affecting citizens' quality of life. But what factors influence people's actual and perceived security? What legal leeway exists, and what financial aspects must be taken into account when it comes to security issues?

The 24th Berlin Colloquium will provide answers to these and further questions from a multidisciplinary perspective. The individual lectures will focus on exemplary aspects and core areas of urban security, and on the well-being of the population; these factors include infrastructure, mobility, leisure activities, and major events in metropolitan areas. The experts will also examine key players and strategies that stand for responsibility and ensuring urban security.

The Berlin Colloquium event format
Experts from the fields of science, economics, and politics meet once a year for the Berlin Colloquium. The interdisciplinary topics covered by this series of events change annually and focus on the area of tension between humans, the environment, and technology. The Berlin Colloquium of the Daimler and Benz Foundation has been firmly established as a scientific event in the German capital for more than 20 years.